Museum

TUKUL 1: African Prehistory

tukul1 Open air museum Tukul 2 Tukul 3 Tukul 4 panel 1 panel 2 panel 3 panel 4 panel 5 panel 6 panel 7 panel 8 panel 9 Open air museum Tukul 2 Tukul 3 Tukul 4 panel 1 panel 2 panel 3 panel 4 panel 5 panel 6 panel 7 panel 8 panel 9 Open air museum Tukul 2 Tukul 3 Tukul 4 panel 1 panel 2 panel 3 panel 4 panel 5 panel 6 panel 7 panel 8 panel 9

 

Herto

The site

Ethiopian locality in the middle course of the Awash where in 1997 Tim White’s team found three fragmentary skulls dated between 160,000 and 154,000 years ago, attributed to Homo sapiens idaltu, regarded as an intermediate species between the earlier archaic sapiens and modern man. Of the three fossils found, the first (BOU-VP-16/1) is a practically complete skull of an adult with a cranial capacity of 1450 cc., like that of a modern man. Various features, such as a relatively accentuated super-orbital torus, set this skull aside from that of anatomically modern man, but point to a different evolutionary line than that of Neanderthal man.

The second (BOU-VP-16/2) is a portion of a skull of an adult with a probably even larger cranial capacity. The third (BOU-VP-16/5), is the skull vault of a ca. 6/7 year-old child. These fossils were associated with industries attributed to the Acheulean and Middle Stone Age, and fauna including a high percentage of hippopotamus remains, which seems to suggest the presence of a butchering site here.


Herto BOU-VP-16-1

 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

J.D. Clark, Y. Beyene, G. WoldeGabriel, W. Hart, P. Renne, H. Gilbert 2003, Stratigraphic, chronological and behavioural contexts of Pleistocene Homo sapiens from Middle Awash, Ethiopia, Nature, 423, pp. 747-752.

T. D. White, B. Asfaw, D. Degusta, H. Gilbert, G. D. Richards, G. Suwa,  F. C. Howell 2003, Pleistocene Homo sapiens from Middle Awash, Ethiopia, Nature, 423, pp. 742-747.


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